What is Wod Workout

Wod of the day

Wod Workout

If you’ve ever heard of a WOD of the day or WOD workout, then you know it stands for Workout of the Day. The phrase is commonly used to reference CrossFit classes. Major calorie burners, these exercise regimens can help you drop the pounds but they’re not for the faint of heart.

Let’s explore WOD workouts. We’ve included 12 beginner WOD workout examples and 6 pro WODs. We’ve added both gym and home WOD exercises.

Wod of the day
Image credits: Freepik

What is WOD?

WOD of the day stands for the Workout of the Day. It’s a phrase commonly used with CrossFit classes as it can mean that a gym or box has a specific workout for the day. While it might include different instructors throughout the day, they will all help train people on the same workout routine for that day.

Because a WOD of the day can vary from one location to the next, there could be thousands of different WODs going on at gyms or boxes. However, they may differ slightly in their technique, equipment, reps and duration.

Ideally, a gym or individual trainer can record each session or class to help you track your progress. Hence, they are not random classes but designed to help you build up your strength training and endurance over time. 

Image credits: Freepik

Is a WOD for You?

People have a love/hate relationship with WODs and they are not for everyone. WODs are addictive, adrenaline rushes because they cover so many different training styles and movements. They can include high-intensity cardio, lifting weights, using your own body weight and several quick reps. Hence, where you burn more calories in less time.

The drawback is WODs are such high intensity, they often have minimal break time. You are using several muscle groups at once and building new muscles in the process. These workouts are comparable to HIIT workouts, P90X and Tough Mudder. They might include snatches, deadlifts and other exercises that force you to push your body to the max.

As they’re unlike other training styles, your body cannot recover or get used to the routines. Hence, your muscles are constantly working (and shaking, i.e., confused and terrified “when will it end?”).

A benefit to doing WODs is that they optimize your athleticism and can increase your speed, balance, power, and agility. Athletes and celebrities use WOD workouts to keep them conditioned and toned.

WODs can ncrease your stamina, fitness level, cardiovascular rate and coordination. So, ask yourself  in your toughest Clint Eastwood voice, “Are you feeling lucky today?” “Should you start a WOD?”

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Why Start a WOD Workout?

If you’re a beginner, WODs can be a bit overwhelming and quite intense. However, you will find that the WOD exercises below can bring you up to speed in no time.

WODs include and help with:

A Standard Weight

A WOD is designed specifically for men and women based on their standard weight. Hence, you’re working based on your body weight.

A Set Number of Reps

WODs are based on the number of reps you can do. This is referred to as As Many Reps as Possible (AMRAP), or as we like to call it, Are You Cray-Cray? (AYCC). It’s about how many reps you can do in a set or segment.

The Correct Posture

A concern with WODs is that they can lead to injuries if you are not careful. As with any exercise, let your trainer, spotter or coach walk you through the WODs. And, listen to your body. Rest when you need to. (on the cab ride home).

The Power Element

WODs tap into that fierce inner warrior to get through the physical and grueling demands of these workouts. Hence, dig deep and then go deeper.

WOD Example

Want a WOD example? Here’s what a WOD might include:

  • Warmups: Instead of a simple walk or jog, you’ll start with lunges, squats, burpies, pushups or pullups. Already out of breath? Great. And, that’s just the warmup. No breaks coming, so let your sweat cool you off.
  • Form: Your trainer might emphasize proper posture to protect sensitive neck and back muscles, for example. 
  • The Workouts: Your trainer or coach will instruct you on the number of reps or give you a set time to complete as many as you can in the fastest time. Again, form is important to avoid injuries.
  • The Cool Down: The end of any routine includes stretching, a cool down and water/electrolytes to rehydrate. Avoiding muscle cramps is super important to ensure proper recovery. Never stop abruptly without stretching as this can lead to injuries.
Wod of the day
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3, 2, 1…WOD!

To improve your overall athleticism, WOD training can target every major muscle group to improve your agility and stamina. WODs can increase your anaerobic power, endurance, balance and coordination.

Here are Beginner CrossFit WOD examples. Buckle up buttercup. We’re going in!

Wod of the day
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Beginner WOD: It’s Not as Scary as It Sounds

CrossFit is tough but let’s not scare newbies away. First-time CrossFitters can start off with introductory sessions first. Hence, use the beginner WOD examples below to see if WODs are for you.

Here are some examples:

Body Weight Workout of the Day

Do 3 sets of 10 for the following exercises: Sit-ups, pushups, burpees, air squats and ring rows. Watch an air squat example here. Unsure about ring rows? Here’s a beginner ring row demonstration.

Burpee WODs

These are different burpee WODs to try. See a Burpee video example for the proper technique and form.

  1. Set your stopwatch for 5, 8 or 10 minutes. Do AMRAP of 10 burpee box jumps. It’s a regular burpee and then you jump on and off a box. Then do 20 kettlebell swings and repeat until the time’s up.
  1. Set a timer for 5, 8 or 10 minutes and do as many burpees as you can.
  1. Do 8 sets of 8 push-ups, 8 burpees, jog in place for a minute and repeat 8 times.
  1. Do 20 each of burpees and deadlifts. Then do 14 each, then 8 each.

Countdown Workout of the Day (WOD)

Start with 10 light to moderate dumbbell thrusters. Then do 10 light to moderate weight kettlebell swings. After completing these sets, do 9 dumbbell thrusters and 9 kettlebell swings, then sets of 8, 7 and so forth until you reach 1.

Jump Rope and Dumbbells

For 5 minutes straight do AMRAP with 60-second rest after each set: Weighted lunges, weighted sit-ups, dumbbell thrusters and jumping rope.

Lunges and Jumps

Do 7 quick rounds of 14 lunges with a light to moderate dumbbell. Then jump rope 50x in a row.

Push, Pull and Then Run

Do 7 rounds of 12 pull-ups, 10 push-ups and then do a half-mile treadmill run.

Running Sandwich

Start with a quarter-mile treadmill run. Then do 40 sit-ups, 30 burpees, 20 air squats and 10 pull-ups. Finish with another quarter-mile run.

SPPR WOD

Do 3 rounds as quickly as possible of 10 dumbbell squats, 10 push presses, 10 pull-ups. Follow that up with a quarter-mile treadmill run.

Squat Sets

Squat with a dumbbell and hold it for two minutes. Do 3 sets of 20 air squats, 15 sit-ups, 12 push-ups, and 10 burpees.

Sumo Deadlifts, Wall Balls and Jump Rope

Do 100 jumps with a jump rope. Then starting with sets of 10 down to 1, do wall balls followed by sumo deadlift high pulls. Finish with 100 jumps with your jump rope.

Tabata Lunges and Push-Ups

Tabata means holding 20 seconds, stopping 10 seconds and then repeating. Set your timer for 5, 8 or 10 minutes and alternate Tabata lunges and push-ups.

Ten for Ten

With your stopwatch set for 10 minutes, do AMRAP of 10 box jumps, 10 ring dips and 10 kettlebell swings.

Note: Need more examples? Do a YouTube search and type in “CrossFit”. Always consult a physician before starting a new exercise program. Stretch before and after and stop if you experience pain to avoid stress fractures, sprains and other injuries.

Wod of the day
Image credits: Freepik

What is the Best Advanced WOD?

Okay, we know this isn’t your first WOD rodeo. Try these advanced WOD routines. Pick one and own it!

Burpee Burnout

Go for 5 two-minute sets of max repetition burpees, quarter-mile sprints followed by 10 regular burpees. Rest 2-3 minutes between sets.

Burpee Squats

Do 20 minutes of AMRAP of 15 weighted back squats and 25 burpees.

Lunge Bar Burner

Set a timer for 20 minutes. Do 100 walking lunges, 100 pullups, 100 medicine ball cleans and 100 pushups.

Wod of the day
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Pullup Squats

Do 20 minutes of AMRAP of 20 single leg squats (alternate legs after each set), 15 push-ups and 10 chest-to-bar pull-ups. Ready for the kicker? Run a quarter-mile after completing every 3 sets.

Squat Pushups

Do 5 or 6 sets each of 25 walking lunge steps, 25 squats and 25 pushups. Next, run for a quarter-mile. Finish strong. Catch your breath. Then have Alexa call you an Uber home.

Walls to Knees

Set a timer for 20-minutes and do AMRAP of 3 wall walks and 10 strict knees to elbows. Having trouble? Do 15 minutes of AMRAP of 50-foot bear crawls and 12 hanging knee raises.

FAQ

Can you do a WOD every day?

Yes, with proper stretching before and after each WOD, you can do these workouts daily. However, always use the proper form to avoid injuries.

What is the workout of the day?

The workout of the day or WOD can vary. It often includes CrossFit type workouts that might be timed where you do as many reps as you can, for example.

What is a For-Time WOD?

A for-time WOD is in the fastest amount of time or as fast as possible (AFAP). Hence, coordination and balance are crucial to avoid injuries.

What is CrossFit WOD?

CrossFit is high-intensity circuit classes with different exercises. They can challenge your stamina, increase your cardiovascular capacity and build your endurance. They can also improve your agility and balance as you gain more power.

How long should a WOD take?

WOD times can typically last 10-20 minutes. However, some WODs, especially the intense, grueling ones, can last 40-minutes to an hour. Just go ahead and schedule a vacation day for the next day or two. You’ll thank us later.